Article published in Medium.

‘If you’re going to do something, commit. I follow this practice and encourage my students to do the same. If you’re filled with fear or you are half in and half out, just don’t do it. Whatever it is. That can be placing an ad, hiring a professional, doing IVF, it doesn’t matter. Indecision dilutes energy and focus, which exacerbates stress, which then loops back into the initial fear. Not pleasant, and definitely not a recipe for success.’

Asa part of my series about the women in wellness, I had the pleasure of interviewing Lynsi Eastburn.

For over 20 years, author and board certified hypnotherapist, Lynsi Eastburn, (MA, BCH) has been helping people globally in their pre-pregnancy and pregnancy journeys. Lynsi is the founder and creator of HypnoFertility, and owns her own private practice and training facility, HypnoFertility International. Through her work in hypnosis, Lynsi helps bring balance to the spiritual and physical worlds and guides babies to their mothers. HypnoFertility is an innovative program created to help those struggling with infertility. Doctors and fertility clinics worldwide support her program, including Dr. William Kiltz and Dr. Maribelle Verdialez from CNY Fertility, Dr. Mark Bush from Conceptions Reproductive Associates, and Dr. Dorothee Struck from Precious Pregnancies — Germany. In 2003, Lynsi expanded her practice and began to train others in her methods. Thus was the creation of 3Keys® HypnoFertility training. Lynsi has been featured nationally on Lifetime Television Network, ABC and CBS News, on national and international radio programs including KOSI After Dark and has been a guest on Toronto’s Breakfast Television and Canada’s @Home morning show. Her latest book, Waiting in the Wings: Introducing the Pink StarLights, shares the journey of unborn babies looking for their mothers, and the revision edition is set to be released on May 24, 2022.

Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Our readers would love to “get to know you” better. Can you share your “backstory” with us?

Hi! Thanks for having me here, so happy to have the chance to chat with you. I’m Lynsi Eastburn. I am a board-certified hypnotherapist, hypnosis instructor, and author, and I am the creator of HypnoFertility.

I have been working with hypnosis to promote fertility for more than 20 years and over this period I developed a specialty program which I originally called HypnoFertility. To distinguish it from what has now become a generic term, my method is now known as 3Keys® HypnoFertility. The 3Keys term comes from the three keys to conception which I received in meditation as I prepared to bring my youngest son into the world back in the early ’90s. I’ll tell you more about those in a little bit.

I’ve been in the healing arts field for nearly 30 years, but my backstory goes back quite a bit farther than that. I’ve always loved babies, and I came into this world concerned that women who truly wanted a baby might be unable to have one. That’s not something little kids tend to worry about, but I was very much aware of it. When I was nine years old, I heard about the first “test tube” baby born in England. I was so happy about it, and I clearly remember where I was when I heard the news. I was sitting in the back seat of my parents’ car and the announcement came on the radio. Listening to the details, a sense of relief flooded me and I had the thought that now any loving person — I didn’t want mean people to have babies, of course! — who wanted a baby could have one.

All my life, I’ve had incredible compassion for those unable to have a baby. And 20 years after that radio announcement, I suddenly found myself actively doing something to help and creating something that would help on a large scale. Something I never could have imagined but was so extremely fulfilling. It warmed my heart and brought me such joy. I embraced HypnoFertility and dedicated myself to getting it out there.

Helping women — men and couples also, but it’s mainly women who come to see me — struggling with infertility to have the babies they long for is my passion, my life purpose. Since I began to recognize the benefits of hypnosis to overcome infertility in my private practice, I have wanted everyone to know about it, to know that it is a very viable option for those having difficulty starting a family.

I have always had a global practice. At one time that meant people were flying in or driving great distances to see me, but thanks to the ongoing development of online technologies, it has become easier and much more convenient for people to work with me. I really love working with clients on Zoom or by phone. And now there are even more options like WhatsApp, Messenger, FaceTime — and Skype has been around forever — so that good connections are assured regardless of where a person is located. And, thanks to Covid, online practices are even more common, not to mention accepted and expected, than when I started working with distance clients 18 years ago.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started your career? What were the main lessons or takeaways from that story?

Because of what I do, I have a lot of interesting stories! One that I think is particularly important is that as I began helping women to get pregnant with hypnosis, I had no way to “prove” it was effective. Women I worked with were getting pregnant, having made no other changes than the HypnoFertility. These women had received dire prognoses, often being told they would never have a baby, that they had a zero per cent chance of ever getting pregnant. As more and more women came to see me, more and more babies “showed up” (that’s how I like to think of it). I didn’t know why, they just did. Soon my clients were telling their doctors about me and the work I was doing with hypnosis to help women get pregnant. But no matter how many women talked about it, no matter how many women who were supposed to be unable to get pregnant did get pregnant, the doctors repeatedly dismissed the results as anecdotal. And I guess, in all fairness, they were. However, anecdotal or not, babies were pouring in — regardless of what anyone thought or said.

So, early on, I knew I was using hypnosis to help women to conceive. I didn’t know exactly how or why it was effective, just that it was, and I trusted that. Women who came in to see me repeatedly said, “I just know there’s a baby there.” I believed them and worked with them accordingly. I didn’t look at numbers or age or diagnoses; I simply followed my intuition and honored theirs. And because I did so, an entire new specialty was born — not to mention a whole lot of babies! I accepted my anecdotal babies, and my clients did too. They didn’t care if the babies were anecdotal or not, they were just so happy to have them.

I didn’t let anyone else’s opinions keep me from continuing with the amazing work I was doing. I embraced the term anecdotal and often said that my clients preferred their anecdotal babies to empirical evidence “proving” that they were possible. I kept it light-hearted, but at the same time I let absolutely nothing deter me from what I would later discover is a major part of my life purpose. I moved forward, I persevered, and now my fertility work has become well-regarded in the medical world as well as the world of energetic or spiritual practice. It has opened eyes, created interest, inspired research, and is no longer easily dismissed.

Main lessons and takeaways? Don’t listen to what others say, listen to yourself. Follow your heart, your gut, your inner knowing… and don’t let anyone or anything stop you. Just because something has yet to be proven, doesn’t mean it isn’t real.

Can you share a story about the biggest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I’d been specializing in HypnoFertility for a number of years when one day I realized that I could see spirit babies around their mothers. I’d always sensed them, and that was one of the reasons I’d been able to support women who also could feel their babies, who were confident that they would have a baby (or more than one), despite being told otherwise. I’ve been in the healing arts for 30 years. As well as being a hypnotherapist, I’m also an intuitive empath, a Reiki Master Teacher in three systems of Reiki, and I’m trained in other forms of energy work and healing modalities. But I’d never considered myself psychic. At first, I’d rationalized the experience of seeing spirit babies floating or flying around my office, deciding that what I was seeing had to be the beginning of a migraine, or that I was tired, or that I had something in my eye. It kept happening however, and always when I was with clients, and before long I couldn’t deny that I was seeing these babies. But I kept it quiet, I didn’t share the information with anyone. I wanted to stick with the practice of what I considered the art and science of hypnosis and leave the psychic stuff to the psychics.

But that was a big mistake. The babies were appearing to me for a reason and my job was to acknowledge them, to figure out why I could suddenly see them, to learn what was next on my journey. I kept trying to compartmentalize, to stick — at least outwardly — with the five senses as much as possible, even though I knew, had always known, there was so much more. Had always used so much more. I’d always incorporated my spiritual gifts and energetic practices into my daily life and into my work with clients. I guess I wasn’t quite ready to embrace the next level of actually seeing these incredible spirit babies.

When one day I finally did tell one of my clients that I could see her spirit baby, she was completely elated. She was also disappointed that I hadn’t shared the information with her sooner and told me I just had to let my clients know whenever their babies popped in for a visit. Because I had been reluctant to admit seeing spirit babies, the evolution of my work slowed a bit. I hadn’t immediately honored my gift in this case; I had instead judged it. That was certainly a big lesson though I hadn’t initially realized it. Fortunately, I did embrace the next level of my spirit baby journey; they had much for me to do, much for me to share with the world.

Let’s jump to our main focus. When it comes to health and wellness, how is the work you are doing helping to make a bigger impact in the world?

Infertility is a global epidemic. I have worked diligently for years to make people aware that hypnosis is a viable option to help with this devastating issue. It is complementary to all other modalities. In some cases, HypnoFertility is an alternative to unwanted medical treatment, but it also aids medical fertility procedures to help increase those success rates, thereby helping prevent the need for repeated use of costly medications and what can be exhausting ongoing treatment. Also, fewer medical treatments result in less use of synthetic substances that concern people and that is huge for health and wellness. I have trained other hypnotists to use what I’ve developed to help others as I do. It is such rewarding work. My process is holistic, it’s non-invasive, and it supports all aspects of mind, body, and spirit. Healing occurs on multiple levels, often beyond the fertility crisis that initiated a person’s quest for help and healing. In turn, babies are born to parents who are tuned into them, are open-minded, who recognize and support the needs of others which previously they may not have even noticed.

Beyond the HypnoFertility itself, and helping people to have their babies, this work is also helping the planet. In a sense, infertility is a symptom that drives people to seek out assistance, and oftentimes that assistance is something they never would have looked into had they not been struggling to get pregnant. I’m talking about lightwork, Reiki and energy healing, meditation, yoga, hypnosis, acupuncture, crystals, a healthier — and sometimes more compassionate — diet, sound healing… that type of thing. All that might be to some extent considered “woo woo,” but which is exactly what our planet needs to recover from the extensive abuses that have been perpetrated upon her.

Can you share your top five “lifestyle tweaks” that you believe will help support people’s journey towards better wellbeing? Please give an example or story for each.

At the top of my list of lifestyle tweaks that will help support people’s journey towards better wellbeing is gratitude. I know it’s a bit of a buzz word these days, but I mean beyond casually throwing the word around or distractedly offering thanks for something or other every once in a while. I mean focused, heart-felt gratitude. Taking time to acknowledge all that we have to be grateful for — the little things as much as the big ones. Intentionally picking something each day, something beyond that which we might easily think of, helps us to enliven our gratitude for everything we are blessed with.

The second lifestyle tweak is to be present, to be in the moment, and to stop or at least ease up on all the worry we get bogged down in. There is an actual study that showed that 85% of things people worry about never happen, so we are wasting precious time and energy stressing out over what we can’t control. In the words of the Dalai Lama: “If a problem is fixable, if a situation is such that you can do something about it, then there is no need to worry. If it’s not fixable, then there is no help in worrying. There is no benefit in worrying whatsoever.”

A third tweak I’d recommend is to do your own work. If we haven’t done our own work, we are not healing, not honoring our higher or authentic self, and we are projecting that which we will not acknowledge or deal with onto everyone around us. There is far too much of that happening these days, and it causes unnecessary strife. Though it may not be easy to do, doing one’s work is vital to living a truly fulfilling life. And, of course, especially during these times, babies need parents who have done their own work, they don’t need to have to parent their parents as happened so much in the past.

The fourth is balance. I talk a lot about what I call the balance of intention and surrender. My clients tend to be doers, achievers. However, “you can’t do a baby.” No matter how much money, time, energy, determination, and anything else someone throws at it, it is just not possible to force a baby to happen. What a person can do is to put their energy into the things they can actually do: intend to have a baby, decide how to go about it, choose practitioners, go to appointments, etc. Now, when I say surrender, I don’t mean to give up, but rather to let go, to allow, to become receptive. The balance of intention and surrender is non-attachment. It is the balance of doing and being.

And finally, I’d say trust. Trust that everything is as it needs to be, that everything is exact and correct. The saying “it is what it is” isn’t bad advice. It can be annoying, especially when what is isn’t what we want. If we win the lottery, it’s easy to accept that it is what it is. When things are not happening as we wish, that is the last thing we want to hear. This is where it is essential to trust.

Ultimately, if we integrate the practices of gratitude, being present, and maintaining balance, and if we do our own work, we can then truly trust that everything is as it needs to be.

If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of wellness to the most amount of people, what would that be?

I would start the Gratitude Movement. This is what I think would bring the most amount of wellness to the greatest number of people. I mentioned gratitude in my life tweak suggestions, and I really feel strongly that dedicated gratitude is what will best cultivate true wellness for everyone — and everything — on our planet, and even beyond. Imagine if everyone practiced true gratitude! Selflessly, collectively, offering heartfelt thanks and blessings for all? How phenomenal would that be?

What are your “5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started” and why?

When I try to think of something I wish someone had told me before I started my career in the healing arts, it seems that no matter what I come up with, I find that someone did tell me. So perhaps I can better answer this question by saying that the issues I experienced aren’t so much because no one told me about them, but more because I didn’t listen or maybe just didn’t realize the depth and breadth of the information. For example, I can say that I wish someone had told me not to let myself get distracted. However, one of my mentors did tell me this, and it didn’t stop me from letting it happen. Those of an entrepreneurial mindset tend to have a lot of ideas. Not just a lot of ideas, but a lot of good ideas, a lot of great ideas. And it’s difficult not to want to implement them all. I’ve definitely gotten distracted by ideas over the years, and I’ve needed to reset my focus more times than I care to recall!

I was fortunate to have excellent training and mentoring from multiple instructors right from the beginning, so there is not a lot that I can say I wish someone had told me before I started. Because I was so fortunate, I try to do the same for my students and pass along everything I can that will help them to be as successful as they desire to be.

I don’t think anyone really told me to learn from multiple instructors. I think this is important and I have trained with some of the best in the field. I encourage people to do that too. But there is such a thing as training with too many people. The more trainings a person does, the more likely they will encounter conflicting information. That is confusing and frustrating. It comes down to balance — it’s good to keep learning but it’s important not to get so caught up in it that you’re never more than a perpetual student.

People tend to be concerned about how much to charge for their services; I find that women especially sometimes feel as though they should not charge much or need to give their services away. I felt that way a bit when I first started doing Reiki, though my RMT never suggested we should. In fact, she encouraged us to value ourselves and our services, and especially emphasized that to be spiritual did not mean you had to give your work away. There was a lot of that type of thinking at the time; there still is. But you can’t help anyone if you’re drained, exhausted, or can’t afford to keep your practice open.

You get what you pay for. Except that’s not always true. It’s not a bad guideline, but it’s not a hard and fast rule. Discernment is critical. People tend to throw this advice around a lot, but I always advise caution — don’t take it literally. Whether you are buying a toaster, hiring a new employee, or choosing a fertility clinic, you’ve got to tune in and look deeper than what you might see on the surface.

If you’re going to do something, commit. I follow this practice and encourage my students to do the same. If you’re filled with fear or you are half in and half out, just don’t do it. Whatever it is. That can be placing an ad, hiring a professional, doing IVF, it doesn’t matter. Indecision dilutes energy and focus, which exacerbates stress, which then loops back into the initial fear. Not pleasant, and definitely not a recipe for success.

Sustainability, veganism, mental health and environmental changes are big topics at the moment. Which one of these causes is dearest to you, and why?

Each of these topics are important to me, but I guess I’d say mental health is especially dear to my heart. I’ve been a vegetarian since I arrived on the planet; I was forced to eat meat as a child, and it sickened me on every level. So, I know that issue well, and while it concerns me deeply, I am pleased that at least now there is more awareness of veganism and many of its concerns than there has been in the past. I feel that mental health is in dire need of attention. Mental illness is still very much ignored, denied, dismissed. It is misunderstood and virtually invisible in much of its scope. There is such a stigma attached to it which so often prevents people from getting the help they need, or even recognizing that there is any help to be had at all.

I’ve personally experienced depression which is quite prevalent in my family of origin. I understand that it is very difficult to see beyond such despair when you are trapped in it, and I have a lot of compassion for those who must endure it repeatedly. I’ve heard people tell people things like “just snap out of it” or “be a man.” If there were a greater awareness of these issues this would not be such a common reaction from those who just don’t get it. They don’t get it and they can’t get it because mental health is not something the larger collective has yet deemed essential.

I’ve seen and supported a lot of mental health struggles, to varying degrees, firsthand. Depression, PTSD, anxiety, agoraphobia, etc. Many years ago, two immediate family members on my husband’s side committed suicide within a few months of each other. I have a semicolon tattoo on my ankle; the Semicolon Project was started in 2013 by a young woman, Amy Bleuel, who wanted a symbol to honor her father following his suicide. “A semicolon is used when an author could’ve chosen to end their sentence but chose not to. The author is you and the sentence is your life.” This movement has made great progress in bringing public recognition — and empathy — to the suffering of so many. Unfortunately, Amy lost her lifelong battle with severe clinical depression and committed suicide at the age of 31. As an empath, I just can’t not understand, just can’t not feel this to the core.